ED KASHI

@EverydayClimateChange is a collaborative Instagram feed that launched in January 2015. It features work from a collective of photographers who share photographs made across the 7 continents. The feed presents visual evidence that climate change doesn’t just happen “over there”; it is also happening “right here”. EverydayClimateChange documents not only the effects of climate change but also potential solutions to mitigate the effects of global warming on our world.

Among the contributing photographers, Ed Kashi shares a range of work from his archive as well as new images from the field. Learn how climate change is impacting people all over the world, and some ways to help combat the effects of global warming. Follow @everydayclimatechange on Instagram for more.

 

Locals go about their routines, stepping over garbage heaps that burn along the railroad tracks in Kaduna, Nigeria on April 3, 2013.

 

Sheep graze in the dry, dusty fields of Farmersville, Calif. on June 29, 2014.

 

Charcoal makers work in the sandy forest, which is an area that twenty years ago was dense with trees. Making charcoal for fuel is one of the daily needs of the people and is also a way to make a living, but it contributes to the loss of vital forests.

 

For the diving fishermen of Pisco, Peru, 1999’s El Nino weather has produced a rich harvest of Concha de Abanico, fan-shaped mussels that are a sought after delicacy. A diver on a fishing boat in Laguna Grande covers himself with a milky liquid which reeks of grease and turpentine but that protects him from the cold waters.

 

The Bartlett Grain Company building lies abandoned and neglected during a drought in Boise City, Okla. on July 30, 2013.

 

A March 2, 2015 NY Times article states, “Drawing one of the strongest links yet between global warming and human conflict, researchers said Monday that an extreme drought in Syria between 2006 and 2009 was most likely due to climate change, and that the drought was a factor in the violent uprising that began there in 2011.” In this photo, a young Syrian refugee is photographed in the Al Za'atri refugee camp for Syrians, near Mafraq, Jordan on Nov. 17, 2013, which at peak capacity (April 2013) held over 200,000 refugees according to UNHCR data.

A March 2, 2015 NY Times article states, “Drawing one of the strongest links yet between global warming and human conflict, researchers said Monday that an extreme drought in Syria between 2006 and 2009 was most likely due to climate change, and that the drought was a factor in the violent uprising that began there in 2011.” In this photo, a young Syrian refugee is photographed in the Al Za’atri refugee camp for Syrians, near Mafraq, Jordan on Nov. 17, 2013, which at peak capacity (April 2013) held over 200,000 refugees according to UNHCR data.

 

Scenes in old Bonny Town on Bonny Island. This is a historical place, where the slave trade and palm oil trade previously was based. Now it’s stuck in poverty and under development while the oil and gas companies expand and grow. None of the locals are given work within any of the gas and oil facilities on Bonny Island, which has caused widespread resentment and frustration. The pollution and environmental degradation of the Niger Delta is striking, particularly in the towns and cities, where the evidence of no sanitation is overwhelming.

 

Muddy feet of Bedouin boys who are drilling for water in the desert in August 1992 in Syria. “The drought that began in 2006 was the worst on record and was “more than twice as likely as a consequence of human interference in the climate system,” shows the report, which was published today in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The country was not prepared for such extreme conditions...Syrians were “vulnerably tied to the land,” says Shahrzad Mohtadi, author of the socio-political component of the study.” Decades-long bad agricultural policies exacerbated the effects of the dry period. In the 1970s, president Bashar al-Assad’s father, Hafez, pushed for the country’s agricultural self-sufficiency rather than sustainability, says Mohtadi. Syria depended on wheat and cotton, both crops which require a lot rain. The quotas for agricultural production were high, which led to the digging of countless, unregulated water wells. The severe, three-year drought depleted the country’s unchecked water resources and caused “widespread crop failure,” the report says.”

Muddy feet of Bedouin boys who are drilling for water in the desert in August 1992 in Syria. “The drought that began in 2006 was the worst on record and was “more than twice as likely as a consequence of human interference in the climate system,” shows the report, which was published today in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The country was not prepared for such extreme conditions…Syrians were “vulnerably tied to the land,” says Shahrzad Mohtadi, author of the socio-political component of the study.” Decades-long bad agricultural policies exacerbated the effects of the dry period. In the 1970s, president Bashar al-Assad’s father, Hafez, pushed for the country’s agricultural self-sufficiency rather than sustainability, says Mohtadi. Syria depended on wheat and cotton, both crops which require a lot rain. The quotas for agricultural production were high, which led to the digging of countless, unregulated water wells. The severe, three-year drought depleted the country’s unchecked water resources and caused “widespread crop failure,” the report says.”

 

Men working on a sewage project near the pyramids on Cairo, Egypt in 1992.

 

In an Ogoniland village in the Niger Delta, an unattended oil wellhead that had been leaking for weeks has turned into a raging inferno. This environmental disaster effects the crops, water, and air for locals forcing farmers and fishermen out of work, amplifying tensions between locals and the oil companies. Oil fires like this one emit large amounts of carbons into the atmosphere, degrading air quality and contributing to global warming. This is one example of the adverse impacts of resource extraction on our climate.

In an Ogoniland village in the Niger Delta, an unattended oil wellhead that had been leaking for weeks has turned into a raging inferno. This environmental disaster effects the crops, water, and air for locals forcing farmers and fishermen out of work, amplifying tensions between locals and the oil companies. Oil fires like this one emit large amounts of carbons into the atmosphere, degrading air quality and contributing to global warming. This is one example of the adverse impacts of resource extraction on our climate.

 

Tavy, or burning of the forest to clear for planting, is illegal but local farmers continue to do this despite the massive reductions of their forests. This tavy is in Manindry Havia. In the distance is one of the few remaining native forests of the region. As the people cut and burn more of their forests, they must go further and further out from their villages to collect wood for their buildings and fires.

 

Dry, cracked earth dominates the landscape in Belay, Madagascar on Jan. 14, 2010. A lack of rain has increased desertification and led to water shortages, which in turn has led to food shortages in this part of the country.

 

In Analavinaky, and all over Madagascar, farmers practice tavy, an illegal slash and burn agriculture that continues to cause massive reductions in their forests. Local people must go further and further out from their villages to collect wood for their buildings and fires.

 

Locals plant rice in flooded fields in 2010. In 2012 & 2013 cyclones made landfall on Madagascar, creating humid conditions favorable to swarms of locusts. The World Food Programme states that 60% of rice production will be affected by the locust invasion. Direct impact from the cyclones and flooding have also severely impacted farmers.

Locals plant rice in flooded fields in 2010. In 2012 & 2013 cyclones made landfall on Madagascar, creating humid conditions favorable to swarms of locusts. The World Food Programme states that 60% of rice production will be affected by the locust invasion. Direct impact from the cyclones and flooding have also severely impacted farmers.

 

Scenes in the town of Jaranwala, along one of the thousands of miles of canals that are in the Punjab. The British built and Pakistani maintained canal systems for irrigation are among the largest in the world and have contributed to making the Punjab a rich agricultural province with adequate water resources.

 

Nana Acheampong and some of his family work on processing cocoa on their farm in Bonsaaso, Ghana on Oct. 3, 2015.

 

Tourists explore Macchu Picchu in October, 1999. These pictures were made on a journey through Peru’s natural and man-made wonders just before the turn of the century. Climate Change is altering the world’s weather patterns. Droughts and storms are becoming both more frequent and more pronounced in countries around the world, and Peru is no exception. In recent years the area that is home to Macchu Picchu has experienced more rain, more intense droughts and more dramatic shifts from one to the other. 

 

Aerials of the Westlands Water district, the largest in the USA, showing the extent of fallowed land due to the drought in California, on July 5, 2014.

 

Forest Covered Mountains of Redwood National Park, California in 1993.

 

US Forest service helicopter using a “helitorch” to burnout along Lake Shasta on the “high complex” fires in the Shasta/Trinity National Forest. Shasta County, CA 1999.

 

Men work in a mine near the small village of Dareta, Nigeria on April 9, 2013. Climate change has caused severe land degradation and as a result a drop in produce yields. Dareta and other communities in Zamafara state, previously sustained by farming and agriculture, have begun to pursue gold mining as an alternative means of livelihood – albeit a dangerous one. Mining has led to a large amount of health problems in workers and their families due to contamination of the environment by substances such as, lead, mercury, and cyanide. Lead poisoning linked to informal mining has killed over 400 children under five years old since March 2010, according to the United Nations.

Men work in a mine near the small village of Dareta, Nigeria on April 9, 2013. Climate change has caused severe land degradation and as a result a drop in produce yields. Dareta and other communities in Zamafara state, previously sustained by farming and agriculture, have begun to pursue gold mining as an alternative means of livelihood – albeit a dangerous one. Mining has led to a large amount of health problems in workers and their families due to contamination of the environment by substances such as, lead, mercury, and cyanide. Lead poisoning linked to informal mining has killed over 400 children under five years old since March 2010, according to the United Nations.

Men work on a brick kiln in Anosibe, Madagascar on Jan. 14, 2010. Mainly fueled by burning wood, this is a very inefficient use of forest resources. Brick kilns also emit carbons and other toxic fumes into the atmosphere, impacting our environment and climate.

Men work on a brick kiln in Anosibe, Madagascar on Jan. 14, 2010. Mainly fueled by burning wood, this is a very inefficient use of forest resources. Brick kilns also emit carbons and other toxic fumes into the atmosphere, impacting our environment and climate.